Farming & Food

Pics of people farming or eating

Photo by Water1st International

Why Water1st Looks to Women for Long-Term Solutions  

Women hold the key. In fact, women are one of the planet’s best resources when it comes to combating climate change and finding solutions. It’s no wonder Water 1st is laser-focused on this same intersection when it comes to clean water solutions.

12313530_1124908850860144_1989376168031367956_n-1

COP21, Gender Equality, & Family Planning

On January 19, Social Good, Family Planning 2020, and the International Conference on Family Planning (ICFP)  hosted a twitter chat about access to family planning and global goals. The conversation brought up a variety of important questions, such as: “What are the biggest barriers to #Family Planning access? How can we overcome them?” and “What are some challenges to sharing stories of… Read more »

(ALL INTERNAL and LIMITED EXTERNAL USES AUTHORIZED) The Ezekiel family in Nkonkwa. Celina 14, (in red) Maritatha 15, (black on right) Felister  12, (bottom left) Fodensia, 8, bottom right, Thalisius, 6bottom middle)  Emiliana (2) in arms of Susan Kabigwa (wearing (brown shirt). The head of the family is Kaboya, 40. The Nature Conservancy is launching a large-scale effort in the Greater Mahale Ecosystem, with Pathfinder International and the Frankfurt Zoological Society to address chimpanzee habitat protection, fisheries management, freshwater protection and community development—including reproductive health. PHOTO CREDIT: © Ami Vitale

Climate Change, Health, and Population Dynamics: A View from Tanzania    

One progressive way of helping at-risk people adapt to climate change is to improve their health. Voluntary family planning, which greatly improves women’s health, could play a part in a rights-based strategy that advances adaptive capacity and women’s health simultaneously.

irene

Climate-Resilient Development? We’re Doing It Already!    

The communities with whom we work in Madagascar clearly articulate the links they see between reproductive health, family size and food security. Their perspectives are not limited by the narrow and vertical approaches that characterize many development initiatives. With issues as cross-cutting as climate change, it is vital that we take a multi-sector approach, in a way that reflects the complexity of the interconnections between people, our health and the environment.

932874_1_090415CAMaliwomenclimate_standard-1

In rural Africa, climate work brings political power to women  

OUELESSEBOUGOU, MALI — At the end of every wet day, Sali Samake walks to a gauge a short distance from the mud brick houses in her village of Tamala in southwest Mali to measure how much rain has fallen. It may seem like a modest activity, but the 58-year-old is contributing to essential knowledge for… Read more »

GHC140718063533-725x483

New partnership brings vital health services to isolated fishing settlements in the Barren Isles archipelago  

I’m standing in the middle of Nosy Lava, the southernmost outpost of a constellation of tiny islands off Madagascar’s west coast. Despite their desolate-sounding name, the Barren Isles sit among one of the few remaining strongholds of thriving marine biodiversity in the western Indian Ocean. To my left, there’s a camp of “Vezo Vahiny” migrants… Read more »

n-INDIGENOUS-INFORMATION-NETWORK-large570

Rural Women Worldwide Are on the Frontlines of Climate Change  

This story starts with an epiphany. It happened when a 28-year-old Kenyan woman named Eunice, a community-health worker, went to visit her mother. Eunice eyed the stove in her mother’s home for a long while, thinking. She had never seen anything like it. It was a closed clay oven, a local design, and it wasn’t… Read more »